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Australia’s first silver crowns or five shillings were struck in sterling silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper) by the Melbourne Mint to mark the coronation of King George VI in 1937. The commemorative appeal and limited popularity of the crown was completely lost when it was issued again in 1938.

The large size and weight, an open design and a clumsy manufacturing process combined to make the Australian crown notorious for bag marks, dings and rim nicks. After striking, the coins were transported by a conveyor belt and dropped into a collection bucket. There are numerous examples of coins which display a neat row of tooth marks imparted by the reeded edge of another crown.

 

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Struck by John Pinches of London for Geoffrey Hearn, this unofficial...

$300.00 inc GST

Casey's Cartwheels was the nick-name given to these large silver five...

$75.00 inc GST

Australia 1937 Crown (Five Shillings) Lustrous Brilliant Uncirculated

$500.00 inc GST

Australia 1937 Crown (Five Shillings) Lustrous nUncirculated/Uncirculated

$125.00 inc GST

Australia 1937 Crown (Five Shillings) Lustrous Uncirculated

$200.00 inc GST

Australia 1937 Crown (Five Shillings) near Uncirculated

$95.00 inc GST

1938 Crown (Five Shillings) Lustrous Uncirculated The large size and...

$2,000.00 inc GST

Copyright 2017 M.R. Roberts